The Sweet Escape

 

When tackling this assessment, my idea’s based around my recordings and photographs looked at depicting a sense of narrative. This piece captures the essence of Fairy Meadow, whilst highlighting the contrast between different regions within the area. I experimented with a wide variety of angles and exposure/aperture settings, and also played around with different cuts like cross fades and fades to emulate the cinematic experience of motion.

At first glance, area fifty-four offers typical sounds of busy streets and campus environment. However, through the exploration of this zone, unfamiliar sounds create a sense of curiosity, producing new discoveries every new recording session.  The idea to integrate both aspects of this area was important, as displaying the vast sound opportunities these zones offer, highlights that although these sites may differ, when incorporated together they give listeners an essence of a particular journey or story, as well as what Fairy Meadow encompasses.

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Assessment 2: Still Image Project (Spatial Portrait): When Two Worlds Collide

My Collection of photographs were inspired by zone 60’s ‘Unwind’

After reviewing all potential sound pieces, the use of ambient, layering and distorted sounds represented throughout ‘Unwind’ captures the essence of Fairy Meadow, whilst highlighting the contrasts between other regions. Through the exploration of this area, unfamiliar sounds create a sense of curiosity, producing new discoveries every new recording session. Throughout this process I discovered the photographer Rob Sheppard to draw inspiration for my own piece. The idea to integrate both aspects of nature human and mother nature was important in portraying a sense of what these areas offer. Displaying the vast visual  opportunities these zones offer, highlighting that although these sites may differ, when incorporated together they give viewers an essence of a particular journey or story, as well as what Fairy Meadow encompasses. Sheppard’s approach in presenting contrast within these photographs played a huge roll in shaping the concept for my still Image project as the incorporation of specific techniques he experiments with, were able to transform my photographs so they are able to match the direction I vision.

When Two Worlds Collide:

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CONSTRUCTING SPACE:

CONSTRUCTING SPACE:

How is space constructed in still images, sequences, and moving image works? What are the conventional language we rely on when attempting to understand what is presented to us? How has this language been experimented with and subverted? This lecture begins by looking at the specific attributes of the photographic image that are used to construct spaces in contemporary photographic works. This lecture examines how space is constructed in still images and how we make sense of photographs.

Nature of Photography:

Stephen Shore writes: “… On the depictive level there are four central ways in which the world in front of the camera is transformed into the photograph: flatness, frame, time, and focus.”. He describes frame work as a photograph having edges; the world does not. The edges separate what is in the picture from what is not.” (Shore, 54)

Flatness:

Flatness is described world is three-dimensional a photographic image is two-dimensional. Because of this flatness, the depth of depictive space always bears a relationship to the picture plane. The picture plane is a field upon which the lens’s image is projected. A photographic image can rest of this picture plane and, at the same time, contain an illusion of deep space.” (Shore, 40)

Time:

‘Just as a three-dimensional world is transformed when it is projected on to a flat piece of film, so a world is transformed when it is projected on to a static piece of film. The exposure has a duration …. ‘a discrete parcel of time’.” (Shore, 72) and example of this is Harold Edgarton’s research using high speed photography and electronic flash at MIT lab, 1963

In conclusion “All photographic prints have qualities in common. These qualities determine how the world in front of the camera is transformed into a photograph; they also form the visual grammar that elucidate the photograph’s meaning.” (Shore, 8)

LANDSCAPES:

LANDSCAPES:

Landscapes capture the relationships of humans and surroundings, telling us more about ourselves rather than nature itself. Depictions of geographic lands forms as a sole subject in Europe only came into existence in the 17th century.

Romanticism: nature form, must respond to feelings,

In response to the industrialisation of the 18th and 19th centuries, romanticism re-directed the cultural focus on “appreciation of natural beauty” and feelings especially those arising from contact with the land.

J.M.V. Turners, Wrekcers Coast of Nothumberland, 1836 is an example of natural force verse human made form, shows the idea of the land is present but human made form also has a lot of power.

Along with this,

J.M.V. Turners, Norham Castle, Sunrise, 1845, The subline, the connection of nature, The idea of landscape is the idea of something humans have constructed.

Photography:

The notion of landscape evolves, looking more at the idea of nature rather than focusing on people. Framing and use of light is important when comparing paintings and photographers when it comes to landscapes. Like maps, landscapes are a reflection of humans, they show how we view the spaces we inhabit through frame our perception.

Land Art: Uses and individual’s perception to frame the image.

“Richard Long’s work ‘A Line in the Himalayas’ (1975) is an example of this stating, “…Walking – as art – provided a simple way for me to explore relationships between time, distance, geography and measurement. These walks are recorded in my work in the most appropriate way for each different idea: a photograph, a map, or a text work. All these forms feed the imagination.”  This physical presence and intervention form part of the strategy to create spatial portraits.

Psychogeography: The framing of landscapes imagines experiences that are not immediately apparent.

An example of this is Bill Henson, Untitled 1985/86, 1985-6

“You grow up wherever you grow up, and in my case it was the suburbs. They surround you and you’re struck by the beauty of it. Gradually I felt an inevitable need to find a visual form for these feelings in relation to the environment I grew up in. I was drunk on the light, on the feeling of these places at dawn and dusk when things were slipping into darkness or coming up out of it.”

In conclusion landscape does not about capture nature, but rather it captures the relationship between humans and their surroundings. We define the frame that encapsulates this landscape through our perception and technology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEOGEOGRAPHY:

NEOGEOGRAPHY:

Neogeography is used to describe new practices engaging in mapping and surroundings through new technologies including satellites, streaming’s and GPS. Ted argues that instead of representations they are actually abstractions, that are not mimicked as it is an abstraction focusing on movement through space. The platform of ‘Thingful’ is an example of how the internet and communication technologies draws data that has a signature to create maps.

The motivation of mapping refers to Mark Graham as his asserts that geographic practices continue to present “spatialities that are always grounded in people’s interpretations of place” shaping our genius loci” which refers to the idea of interpreting place. Motivation to map, looks at placing humans within there cosmography, which is an odd place created through time and space to provide data navigation, building a deeper understanding as well as genius loci.

The idea of Fabrica looks at the making of the world, involving Art, Craft, Manufacture, Human act of making, Along with Scientia referring to Knowledge, Discipline, Skill and Cognition. Christian Jacob writes, “the map is the materialisation of the abstract and intellectual order extracted from the universe, so without the map, the world has no contour, no limit, nor form or dimension.”

Modern images like ‘The Blue Marble, 1972’ showing the last whole image of the earth relates to Denis Cosgrove statement of “achieving the global view to loose the bonds of the earth, to escape the shackles of time, and to dissolve the contingencies of daily life for a universal moment of reverie and harmony.” The idea of seeing the world as a whole instead of maps creates a better understanding of what the earth involves. Furthermore there’s a suggestion that images of maps and the earth offer not just data, but the write the relationship of what we know and what we are.

Architect Laura Kurgen book Close Up at a Distance: Mapping, Technology, and Politics looks at highlights how satiating imaging is mediated by and subjected layers of political, social cultural and economic control, auguring this is how the raw materials of new geographic maps are interpreted that is essential to the worlds we create. Kurgen states “The interpretation of such images is an art, as well as a science— because it inherently involves imaginative leaps—the putatively scientific and objective interpretations at the service of governments and commercial institutions tell only a story, not the story, of what is going on in these images. Views of the globe, which is to say, maps, have always combined the science of spatial description and documentation with a certain art, as well. J. B. Harley argued famously that maps should be understood as multidisciplinary artefacts, ones that reveal social and political forces, as well as representations of power.”

 

 

 

 

 

SOUND-ART: The Getaway:

 

When tackling this assessment, my idea’s based around my recordings look at depicting a sense of narrative. The sound art piece captures the essence of Fairy Meadow, whilst highlighting the contrast between different regions within the area. At first glance, area fifty-four offers typical sounds of busy streets and campus environment. However, through the exploration of this zone, unfamiliar sounds create a sense of curiosity, producing new discoveries every new recording session.  The idea to integrate both aspects of this area was important, as displaying the vast sound opportunities these zones offer, highlights that although these sites may differ, when incorporated together they give listeners an essence of a particular journey or story, as well as what Fairy Meadow encompasses. The inspiration behind this piece refers to world known sound editor ‘Lon Bender’, with a particular look at his involvement within the ‘Hunger Games Franchise’. Benders approach in presenting contrast within these his films played a huge roll in shaping the concept for my sound- art project, as the incorporation of specific techniques he experiments with, were able to transform my recordings so they are able to match the direction I aspired my piece to be.

 

SOUND ART:

Week 2 // (10/03/16)

This lecture provides an overview of sound art from the beginning of the 20th century to contemporary works. Sound Art looks at certain works that have common characteris. Sound Art characterises work that is looked at as breaking away from traditional music forms, such as classical music as well as the move to break away from traditional exhibitions and performance venues, like concert halls. However at the same times these experiences have roots in music, especially innovations within the 19th and 20th century, Highlighting how we cannot reference sound art without referencing music as a form of expression and engagements.

Sound art incorporates all oral experiences, highlighting the departure away from formal music traditions. It relates to other forms and disciplines in the executions, engaging in many diffrence forms like audiences, architecture and conceptual art. It’s not a discrete field due to the different connections made through other creative practice fields.

Alan Licht’s book, Sound Art: Beyond Music, Between Categories looks at a general survey of sound art from three different angles.

“Sound art comes from the appreciation of the total environment of sounds, both wanted and unwanted” (Licht 116)

Sound is looked at as temporal medium, meaning as you listen to it, attention needs to be made.  The lecture looked at Bill Viola’s, ‘Reasons for Knocking at an Empty House: (Writings 1973-1994)’ as his stories illustrate how fundamental a temporal axis to the audio medium is to experience, separating sounds from visual.

Another example used was Luigi Russolo’s and view of not creating the art of music and harmony but just the noise, in his book ‘The Art of Noise’ he states;

“At first the art of music sort purity, Liberty and sweetness of Sound. Then difference sounds were amalgamate, care being taken, however, to caress the Car with gentle harmonies. Today’s music, as it becomes continually more complicated strives to amalgamate the most dissonant, strange and harsh sounds. In this way we come ever closer to noise sound” (Russolo)

He looks at the idea of the break so a new modern sound can be created, along with stating;

“Dismiss coevolution is parallel by the multiplication of machines, which collaborate with man on every front. Not only in the roaring atmosphere of major cities, but in the country too, which until yesterday was totally silent, the machine today has created such a variety of rivalry of noises that pure sound, in its exiguity and monotony, no longer arouses any feeling” (Russolo)

Highlighting why we should celebrate the technology and noise of the city, compared to the quiet of the country sides, so machines can celebrate along with relationship of the sounds these machines make.

  • New Recording Sound Technology:

Sound technology created a revolutionary, fundamental break for human culture experiences, with technological inventions including the ‘Phonautograph’, Thomas Edison’s ‘Phonograph’, ‘Magnetophone’ leading to Guglielmo Marconi invention of the ‘Radio’.By the early 20th century there was anticipation for this technology to be used by musicians and composers, as a new form of expression. Along with this the relationship between sound and cinema is the backbone to how a sound can be manipulated, just like recorded images. Through experimenting with sound art, new technologies were discovered such as looping and sampling as well as changing the quality of sound as you add it. John Cage’s piece  ‘4’33’ was a conceptual/idea driven art piece that was very popular throughout it’s time looking at the Idea of sound through metaphorically opening your ears, creating an individuals to hear more rich strands, along with a sound scape.

  • Ambient Sounds:

‘The World Soundscape Project’ is a documentary archive/ sound snap shot that looks at Phonautograph and the idea of what actually contributes your acoustic ecology, and what marks the sound of play.